Around the Web: Redditor Creates the Next Biggest Smartwatch (Not Really)

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Move over, Apple. Take a seat, Tag Heuer. As far as smartwatches go, Redditor Lord_of_Bone has you all beat. Introducing the latest entry into the crowded smartwatch market—a developer-built Raspberry Pi wristwatch running Windows 98. Ok, ok, so this thing won’t exactly be taking the world by storm, but all kidding aside, it’s pretty darn cool.

Raspberry Pi Windows 98Gizmodo, which first wrote about the device here, explains that the do-it-yourself developer pulled inspiration from his favorite ’80s and ’90s-era sci-fi shows, which often portrayed futures where large, wrist-mounted computers were the norm. The device runs on Raspberry Pi A+ (available here for about $22) and is operated through a large touchscreen and five buttons.

Of course, smartwatches in one form or another have had a place in the watch world since watches have gone beep-beep-boop. Two such examples include the infamous Seiko T001 TV watch—a clunky beast of a thing from the early ‘80s bringing together a portable television receiver with a small LCD screen—and the Casio VivCel VCL-100—a proto-smart watch with an antenna that would cause the watch to vibrate when there was an incoming call.Seiko TV WatchMore information on the product can be found on Lord_of_Bone’s website, and he has since created a short video to discuss the project and to showcase how it works (spoiler: the boot times are hilarious).

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Ilya is worn&wound's Managing Editor and Video Producer. He believes that when it comes to watches, quality, simplicity and functionality are king. This may very well explain his love for German and military-inspired watches. In addition to watches, Ilya brings an encyclopedic knowledge of leather, denim and all things related to menswear.
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