Introducing the Undone Urban Chronograph, a Customizable Watch That Won’t Break the Bank

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Customization has had a place in watch collecting for quite some time now. For enthusiasts interested in something a bit more unique or personal, a custom-designed watch has offered a way to scratch that individualistic itch. For starters, one can modify an existing watch with aftermarket parts. Or one can opt to build a watch from readily available parts. Now, we’re seeing in increasing frequency brands that offer customizable watches straight from the source.

Undone, which we first wrote about last year, is one such company. Their flagship diver, the Aqua, launched last year to great success, becoming a highly popular template for modification with an overwhelming number of choices via the brand’s website. Now, piggybacking off the success of their first watch, Undone has returned with their latest project—the retro-inspired Urban Chronograph.

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The Urban Chronograph collection features five base models inspired by iconic chronographs. Additional customization is available with many choices of case finishes, hands, dials and straps.

The Urban Chronograph features a stainless steel case measuring 40mm wide with a lug-to-lug length of 47mm, 13mm thick, and a lug width of 20mm. While it’s larger than most vintage chronographs, it’s still reasonably sized, especially with the tempered lug-to-lug dimension.

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The base stainless steel case features a mix of brushed and polished surfaces.
Note the dramatic, vintage-inspired profile of the Urban Chronograph.

The case itself is stepped, with straight beveled lugs, long mushroom pushers and an onion crown. Undone chose a domed K1 hardened mineral crystal over a domed acrylic crystal that can be found on most vintage chronographs. In terms of finishing, the case can be left in standard brushed/polished stainless steel, it can be customized with black PVD and both yellow and rose gold plating, or it can feature a mix of finishes for a two-tone look.

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Powering the watch is the SII VK61, one of Seiko’s reliable meca-quartz movements. You can opt for a solid case back or an open one showing the movement.

What really makes the Urban Chronograph are the dial choices. There are several great designs in the line-up inspired by popular vintage watches, among them the Navitimer (Navi), Autavia (Auta), Speedmaster (Speedy), Daytona (Newman), and Dato Compax (Killy).

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From left to right: the Navi, Killy, and Speedy.

All the dial designs carry elements from their inspirations, while sticking to the 12 and six o’clock sub-dial configuration. The different hand styles compliment each design and of course, since this is customizable, can be swapped as the purchaser sees fit.

Undone has turned to Kickstarter and has already exceeded its funding goal (at the time of writing, Undone has raised $152,200 of the $19,300 needed). The pledge choices for the Urban Chronograph let buyers take one of the aforementioned pre-built designs, or you can opt for a custom design which you can submit via Undone’s visualizer. The fixed designs start at about $155 and the fully-customized option starts at about $170.

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The Undone team has developed a great visualizer that allows you to play numerous combinations.

Undone offers several pledge levels allowing you to get more than one and as many as six custom watches for the bundle price of $928. The project is running through the end of 2016 (ending Saturday, December 31, 11:37 PM Mountain Standard Time) and delivery is expected within the first quarter of 2017.


To get yours, head over to the Urban Chronograph Kickstarter.

 

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Residing in North Idaho, James has been wearing a watch for over 35 years. With growth of the internet in the late 90s watches as an interest turned into an obsession. Since that time he has been a watch forum moderator, watch reviewer, contributor to Nerdist, and operates Watches in Movies in his spare time.
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  • Thomas

    They hit the nail on the head with the inspired designs. However, after seeing a lot of their pretty crazy watches on Instagram, it makes me wonder what kind of direction Undone is going to be. These designs are a complete 180 from their first offerings, and it’s almost hard to picture them as being from the same company.

    • Terrance Steiner

      There first offering was completely custimizable. You have the option of making a classic looking watch or making one that is kind of crazy. Play around with there customizer a bit. It is kind of cool what you can come up with. I am partial to the Navi but not quite ready to pull the trigger. Even this vintage inspired watch can come up with some weird “modern” designs if you play around with them.

      https://www.undone.watch/watch/customize/urban-vintage/209-214-216-152-155-243-246

  • Terrance Steiner

    A display case back for a quartz movement? I would prefer a solid case back. I personally think to many watches have display case backs these days. If you have an undecorated movement I do not see the point. That being said I kind of love the design.

  • Terrance Steiner

    There is not 7 dial options. There is 22. I was just playing around with their custom watch selection. They have have 7 vintage inspired dial options and 11 “Urban Modern” which look to be gloss dials and 4 “Urban Classic” which look like sunburst dials. Not really a fan of the Modern ones. If I were to buy one I would probably go with the Navitimer homage.

  • Shinytoys

    An idea that I personally feel is way overdue. Make it your own for a relatively small amount of money. Perhaps the future will allow for auto and manual winders. The Miyota 9015 or The Seiko Nh-35 would be excellent choices and still keep the price down…

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