Hands-On with the Marloe Watch Company Lomond Chronoscope

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A few years ago, we wrote about the the Cherwell watch from a small outfit out of the UK, Marloe Watch Company. Featuring a multi-level dial and powered by a mechanical Seagull ST36 movement, the Cherwell was a strong first effort from the young brand. The watch was not without its faults, as we noted in our review, but it showed some promising design sensibility from the burgeoning firm.

Marloe Watch Company is back with its latest project dubbed the Lomond Chronoscope, a series that consists of four distinct chronograph watches. With one foot in the past and another in the present, the Lomond Chronoscope pulls on the best elements of the Cherwell, mixes them with some cues from a handful of notable references, and ultimately creates something that feels surprisingly unique and contemporary. It’s not another racing-inspired chronograph, nor is an outright homage. And while there is a certain level of familiarity here, the Lomond Chronoscope ultimately feels like its own design.

Marloe Lomond Chronoscope - 5The project is currently being crowdsourced on Kickstarter starting at $372 as of this writing, with the lower early-bird pricing having sold out within the first day of the launch. Making that price even sweeter is the fact that the Lomond is powered by a mechanical chronograph engine—a Seagull ST19.

I was immediately drawn to the design, so I reached out to get my hands on some samples to see if the quality held up in the metal. Let’s take a closer look.

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$372

Hands-On with the Marloe Watch Company Lomond Chronoscope

Case
Stainless steel
Movement
Seagull ST19
Dial
Various
Lume
C3 Super-LumiNova
Lens
Box acrylic
Strap
Calf leather
Water Resistance
50m
Dimensions
43mm x 46.6mm
Thickness
13.6mm
Lug Width
22mm
Crown
Push/pull
Warranty
1 year
Price
$372

The case measures 43mm wide, 46.6mm lug-to-lug, and 13.6mm tall. In a practical sense, however, the watch wears a bit smaller than the given dimensions due to the tempered lug length and the bezel, the latter of which tends to bring in the width of a watch.

In profile, the case does look quite thick, despite 13.6mm not being exceptionally tall for a chronograph (I should note that some of that height comes from the acrylic box crystal).

Marloe Lomond Chronoscope - 27
The entirety of the case features a high-polish finish.

This perception is largely created by the case design. The mid-case is somewhat of a slab, a detail that is accentuated by the case’s high-polish finish. The delineation between the mid-case and the bezel does provide a small break, but it’s not enough to temper the appearance of the height. That said, when worn the watch doesn’t feel overly thick as it dips into the wrist, which is likely due to the relatively flat case back.

In terms of the geometry, the case is quite attractive. It features soft lines and short curving lugs. The case tapers from the bezel down to the case-back, which comes in at roughly 38mm. I quite like the uninterrupted path down to the case. When combined with the taper, it gives the case a bowl-like shape that often translates to a comfortable experience on the wrist. This was something they also did with the Cherwell to great success.

Marloe Lomond Chronoscope - 24On the right side of the case are a set of pushers and a large crown. The crown widens away from the case, is concave at the top and has twisting grooves for proper grip. The prototype that I have here has a crown that screws down, which is in my opinion an awful way to go for a hand-cranker. Thankfully, the engineers were wise to this and the production model will feature a push-pull crown with a set of O-rings for water-resistance.

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The construction of the crown will change, but the design will remain the same.
There is printed text along the perimeter of the crystal. It includes the following quote from poet and lyricist, Robert Burns: “Nae man can tether time or tide.”

Flipping the watch over is an open case back showcasing the Seagull ST19, a caliber that is essentially a clone of the iconic Venus 175 movement dating back to the ‘40s (it’s the same movement that you’ll find in the Seagull 1963 chronograph). It boasts a column wheel and features some superficial decoration, including blue screws, some striping and gold-tone bridges, wheels and plates. While it’s not the most beautiful of movements, there’s a lot of value packed into what is essentially one of the most affordable mechanical chronograph calibers currently on the market. And it’s what is helping keep the cost down here.

Marloe Lomond Chronoscope - 21
The register at three is a 30-minute totalizer, and the one at nine is the active seconds.

In terms of basic operation, it runs at a rate of 21,600 bhp, it does not hack, and as far as the chronograph functions go there is a central sweep hand and a 30-minute totalizer at three.

Now, I have to admit that the ST19 is not my favorite mechanical chronograph. My biggest gripe with this movement is the pusher action. You just don’t get the same satisfying resistance and click as you would with a Valjoux 7750. With that said, as far as gripes go, this one is relatively minor.

The Lomond Chronoscope comes in four flavors split into two distinct styles: Classic and Vintage. We received one from each for review. The Classic White features a white dial with a subtle metallic sheen. The printed markings are grey with red and green lume accents. The Vintage Coffee then has a dark brown glossy dial that looks nearly back at times, with markings that are a mix of gold and green lume (which doesn’t read so green here) and a splash of red. A set of bronze sub-dials anchor the design.

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The Classic White. The Classic series features a matte ceramic insert with a telemeter scale.
The Vintage Coffee. The Vintage series features a polished cermamic insert.

Like the Cherwell that came before it, the Lomond features a stacked dial. The top layer is reserved for the lume plots denoting each hour; the logo below 12; and “CHRONOSCOPE,” the water-resistance rating and “HAND WOUND” above six.

The sub-dials at three and nine then are two cut outs revealing the bottom layer. Both sub-dials feature concentric circles. Moving now to the very outer edge of the dial, you have a steep drop that takes you back to that bottom layer. This is a look that mimics classic stepped dial. Here, you’ll find the chronograph seconds track, with a polished marker at every five-minute mark, large hash markers for every minute/second, and smaller hash markers for an additional 1/5th scale.
One very cool detail worth noting is that the box crystal magnifies and distorts this track when viewed head on, giving greater presence to the applied and seconds markings while obscuring the smaller scale.

The hands are faceted swords center-filled with Super-Luminova. Then, you have the central chronograph hand–a long arrow with a lumed tip and a skeletonzed lollipop counterbalance. At the sub-dials there is a set polished tapering needles. Overall, the handset here is quite attractive and feels appropriate to the watch, adding enough personality without drawing attention away from the beauty of the dials. Marloe Lomond Chronoscope - 20

When explaining the process behind the design, Oliver Goffe and Gordon Fraser—the duo behind Marloe Watch Company—offered the following:

“Whilst there will always be debate over design decisions, we feel that we’ve managed to create a watch that looks both unique and fresh whilst feeling familiar and recognisable; the constituent parts all working together to form a cohesive piece.”

Marloe Lomond Chronoscope - 35
Each watch is paired with a strap that comes with an engraved buckle and quick- release bars.

I couldn’t agree more. While there are certainly some recognizable elements, the total end result feels fresh and intentional. In fact, if Junghans ever produced a sports chronograph under the Max Bill line, I can’t help but imagine this isn’t too far off from what that might be. All in all, they nailed it.

And it seems I’m not the only one with this opinion. Others seem to be drawn to the design, too, as the Kickstarter campaign reached its goal in just 25 minutes. At the current going rate of $372, this is one hell of a value-packed watch. Units are expect to ship October 2017.


To reserve yours, head on over to the Lomond Kickstarter Campaign.

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Ilya is worn&wound's Managing Editor and Video Producer. He believes that when it comes to watches, quality, simplicity and functionality are king. This may very well explain his love for German and military-inspired watches. In addition to watches, Ilya brings an encyclopedic knowledge of leather, denim and all things related to menswear.
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  • Chris

    Nice review! Is it possible to do a review on their Derwent? I haven’t seen any information on it otherwise.

  • Tobias

    Is it really only 13.6mm to the top of the crystal? I habe never seen a watch look that thick under 15mm.

  • Tomas Tran

    oh man this looks cool and I have a finger on the triger

    do you think they will sell spare telemeter bezel insert if I buy black/bronz ? …dont know if I will use anyhow the telemeter

  • Porter Hudson

    IMHO: Kickstarter is a fantastic place but the majority of the new watch ideas are a bit too cobbled from parts bins or heavily derivative of something already available. I think these 2 designs are very nice efforts design-wise. I’m too door jam happy to ever risk any non-sapphire crystal however and the shiny subdials on the black cheapen the design on the black face a bit. I like the white “Grey Side of the Moon” thing going on and the red type from those Ro-what’s their names influence and bless them for some arched text at the bottom, my favorite thing about any one Tudor’s 200 colors of Black Bays. Add a brushed case and some sapphire to that bad boy, swap the bird motor for a Seiko something and heck I’d crack off another 5 bills for the thing.

  • Bellaggio

    Seagull is a Chinese movement. Whoever buys this will find out the hard way how 1) inaccurate 2) unreliable they are. This watch cost around $60 to manufacture, congrats on being ripped off.

  • DGS70

    Tasteful design, but “Hand Wound?” Has someone already wound it for you? Is that like “hand-dipped” ice cream? “Mechanical” would be more appropriate. Hand Wound makes me cranky. HA!