Tate Wade Bokeh Video Review

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A few months back, Switzerland-based newcomer Tate Wade successfully completed a Kickstarter campaign for the brand’s inaugural collection dubbed Bokeh. Teaming up Studio Divine—a noted design firm perhaps best known for its influential work with SEVENFRIDAY and REC—the founders of Tate Wade wanted to create a photography-inspired collection of watches. Born of that collaboration, the Bokeh series subtly—some might argue perhaps a bit too subtly—hints at that inspiration, with certain elements of the case and dial pulling from that source.

The Bokeh collection is available in three distinct flavors: Stainless Steel, Black PVD, and Gun Metal PVD. Of the three, we chose the Gun Metal PVD for review, with that particular model being the most striking of the three with the tuning of the colors here arguably being the best fit for the design. The case is, as mentioned, finished in a really attractive gunmetal PVD, and the dial is a mix of layered surfaces featured in charcoal gray, copper, rose gold, and silver.

Now, this design won’t be for everyone, and it’s fair to critique the prominent logo (both in terms of design and overall placement), the use of an altimeter date aperture, and the overall size of the watch and what that does to the proportions of the dial. That said, it’s hard to find any fault in the in-hand feel of the watch. This thing is really well-made, and the three watches of the Bokeh series are executed to a high level, feeling solidly-engineered and excellently finished in person.

For our full review, watch the video below:

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$800

Tate Wade Bokeh Video Review

Case
Stainless steel; gunmetal pvd
Movement
ETA 2824
Dial
Grey
Lume
Super-LumiNova
Lens
Sapphire
Strap
Black leather/faux crocodile
Water Resistance
50m
Dimensions
42mm x 50mm
Thickness
11mm
Lug Width
20mm
Crown
Push/pull
Warranty
Yes
Price
$800

The model featured here retails for about $800 (it went for about $460 during the Kickstarter campaign), which makes this a high-valued piece being that it is Swiss-made watch with an ETA 2824. Furthermore, it was designed and engineered from the ground up—no catalog parts here. All in all, the Bokeh collection is a solid first outing for the brand, with the watches boasting a relatively unique design language that may make for some exciting future releases. If they can maintain the price point, the inventive aesthetic, and the overall build quality going forward, Tate Wade may be one to watch out for. Tate Wade

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Ilya is worn&wound’s Managing Editor and Video Producer. He believes that when it comes to watches, quality, simplicity and functionality are king. This may very well explain his love for German and military-inspired watches. In addition to watches, Ilya brings an encyclopedic knowledge of leather, denim and all things related to menswear.

ryvini
  • SittingBullAZ

    Wait. What time is it?

  • error406

    If only the designer had shown a little bit more restraint and discipline. And the patience to iterate a lot more times before declaring the design “finished”.

    This is typically the work of a designer too much in love with their own concept and neither the strenght to give it up, nor the discipline to spend time (years if necessary) to get it right.

    • egznyc

      It has a random “eclectic” aesthetic, the kind that says “I don’t care what you think, because I’m a young hipster who sets the trends.”

      What was the point of using those small lume tips on the hands – and only the hands? I’d hoped the outer chapter ring had lined indices but apparently not. And that date aperture – just not my thing.

  • melprophet

    As an enthusiast photographer, I would love to have a watch themed off of something photography related, but this just doesn’t do it for me at all. The logo is too big and draws the eye right to it and away from the rest of the watch. It’s also horribly placed. Why would you cover a numeral with it? You have to have a giant TW logo? Can’t at least make it smaller and use some of that open real estate on that dial? Can’t use text branding instead? I don’t want to sound mean, but there’s no way not to…The most important thing to the designers of this watch was to put that logo on it.

  • BJ314

    Comments are very nick-picky and pretentious this go-around. Beautiful watch. Unique and distinctive. Logo is attractive and full of character, which is says a lot through the execution of attractive typeface and placement. The crown, date window and lume leave impressions.

    I for one am glad the designer used less restraint, as to ensure the watch won’t be confused with others. A lot of what people pass off as good design is boring, predictable and rehashed. I hate to be the one to admit it, but most days I can wear a $1,100 watch and no one notice, except me! That’s what restraint will get you. lol What’s the point of wearing a watch that completely blends in with your outfit, that looks and feels like nothing special? This is a watch that is enjoyable for the owner and by-standers.

    Anyone suggesting a designer should spend years designing a watch that will retail for $800 has probably never owned a business. It’s one thing to dispute whether this watch is attractive, is another thing to suggest that it was poorly designed. Anyone can see the attention to detail and love for good design here.

    • egznyc

      You are entitled to your opinion and I am entitled to mine. You clearly like this design and I did not. I don’t believe there was anything unfair or pretentious in my comments, however. Good design is not boring; on that we can agree. But that which is “interesting” is not – necessarily – enough to make me want to wear it.

    • Josh

      From a graphic design viewpoint, the logo placement is interesting, but the logo itself is pretty uninspired. If you’re gonna highlight something, make it highlight worthy.