Eza Watches Re-Launches with the Sealander

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It is always exciting to see that a new watch brand is launching, whether it is on its own or using a crowdfunding platform. Especially if the watch or watches offered are addressed more towards the watch nerd rather than at the fashion market (as is seen so frequently in the Kickstarter space). Even more exciting though is when an old brand resurfaces. Such is the case with Eza Watches, who just announced their first model under new management.

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The brand began in 1921 in Pforzheim, Germany. The wristwatch maker became known for their water resistant watch cases during the 1940’s and began making their own movements, cases and dials into and through the 1950’s. In the 1960’s they began making their own automatic movement which was produced until 1972, but unfortunately the brand went bankrupt in 1979 as a result of the quartz crisis. Now the brand has resurfaced, helmed by Diederik van Golen and Adriaan Trampe who are determined to bring the brand back to its heyday. To begin, they have launched the new Eza Watches Sealander, a vintage inspired diver true to the roots of the brand.

At first look the Sealander does give off a vintage vibe. The simple dial, no crown guards and basic bezel lend to that feel. The case of the Sealander measures in at 41mm with a thickness of 14.25mm and a lug width of 22mm. As mentioned the case has no crown guards which lends to the vintage feel akin to no-guard Submariners and Seamaster 300s. The crown itself is a signed, screw down crown that combined with the screw down case back lends to the 300M water resistance of the watch. The simple bezel insert matches the dial color in either black or blue and hints at the Blancpain Fifty Fathoms. The unidirectional bezel has a ceramic inlay and C3 SuperLuminova to top things off.

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As mentioned above the dial of the Sealander will be available in either black or blue. Both dials feature C3 SuperLuminova filled hour indices with a minute/second track at the outer ring of the dial. The date is located at the 4:30 position and, in a nice touch, matches the dial color with white numerals. The dial has a subtle cross-hair indentation extending from the center of the dial outward, utilizing the empty space on the dial well. The dial markings are kept simple and  lend to the vintage feel, as does the Eza script logo at 12 o’clock. This is the same style as one you will find on vintage Eza watches, including the “automatic” text underneath the company name. At 6 o’clock is simply the water resistance rating, 300M. It’s a clean and classic look, and is capped off with the sword style hands that again are C3 Super Luminova. Rather than thick bodied Roman sword hands, the Sealander’s hands are thinner throughout, giving a more elegant feel. The crystal used is a doubled domed anti-reflective sapphire crystal.

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The movement selected for the Eza Sealander is the popular Citizen Miyota 9015, which we all are so familiar with. The movement has been used by a number of micro-brands in the last few years and makes an appearance in this resurrection as well. Certainly a departure from what the brand made in the past, and an interesting way to bring the brand back. Eza is taking the extra step to ensure the movement is adjusted to six positions before the watch is sealed and sent out for wear. The watch will ship with both a vintage leather strap (in black, brown or cognac) and an Eza labeled Mil-strap, as well as a carrying roll. The watch will also come with a full movement service after three years of ownership; a rare and very nice addition to the package.

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The Eza Watches Sealander is available for pre-order now via the Eza Watches website with shipment expected to begin June 2016. The pre-order price is €849.00 (w/VAT) / ~$960 USD. You can also follow the company on social media via their Instagram account and Facebook page.

Residing in North Idaho, James has been wearing a watch for over 35 years. With growth of the internet in the late 90s watches as an interest turned into an obsession. Since that time he has been a watch forum moderator, watch reviewer, contributor to Nerdist, and operates Watches in Movies in his spare time.
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