Introducing the Redesigned Oris Artelier Complication, Accessible Luxury Done Right

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Oris is perhaps best known for its diver’s watches (Divers Sixty-Five, Aquis); pilot’s watches (Big Crown ProPilot); and its growing collection of impressive in-house calibers (Calibre 110, 112, 113). The love for many of these among the watch enthusiast community is not without merit, but there’s another collection under the Oris umbrella that is worthy of your attention, and that’s the Artelier line, and within that, the Artelier Complication.

The Artelier Collection is Oris’ platform for its (largely) more classic offerings, and the Complication is a watch that holds a bit of importance for the brand. The first Complication was introduced in 1991 during the post-Quartz Crisis recovery. In the mid-‘80s, Oris committed to producing only mechanical movements, and the aptly-named Complication, with it’s package of classic complications—among them a day, date, moon phase, and a second time zone indication—signaled a return to a more traditional approach to watchmaking. The Complication has been a part of Oris’ catalogue ever since.

Introducing the new–and improved–Oris Artelier Complication, a beautiful example of accessible luxury done right.

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For 2017, Oris is giving the Complication a facelift, offering a new, streamlined case and Art-Deco-inspired guilloché dial. The 40mm case features slimmer tapering lugs and a less prominent bezel, giving the mid-case an attractive, contemporary look. This is carried over to the dial, which is available in two distinct flavors here: a warmer tone with rose gold-plated hands and applied hour markers, and a cooler take with blue hands and markers.

The layout of the dial is relatively straightforward. There’s a moon phase at 12, a date sub-dial at nine, day sub-dial at three, and a 24-hour second time zone at six. The second time zone is operated via a pusher at four. The whole thing comes across as classic without feeling too stuffy.

Glass sandwiches the case, with a double-domed, AR-coated sapphire at the front and mineral exposing the Calibre 781 in the back. The 781 is a rebadged and modified Sellita SW200 adorned with Oris’ signature red rotor. The case is rated to 5 bar.

Each watch is paired with a matching colored band: blue hands and markers with a blue leather strap; rose gold hands and markers with brown. Both styles are also available on a fine-link stainless steel bracelet. While I generally prefer watches like these on leather, the bracelet is an especially attractive option here. The taper down from the lugs creates a beautiful flow with the lines of the case, and the juxtaposition of larger outer links against seven rows of fine center links feels very high-end.

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The Oris Artelier Complication is exemplary of what Oris does best, and that’s offering value-driven, accessible luxury timepieces. The US retail price is $2,250 on leather and $2,450 on the metal bracelet. Oris

Ilya is Worn & Wound's Managing Editor and Video Producer. He believes that when it comes to watches, quality, simplicity and functionality are king. This may very well explain his love for German and military-inspired watches. In addition to watches, Ilya brings an encyclopedic knowledge of leather, denim and all things related to menswear.
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